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Radford, Nottinghamshire

[Up to 1834] [After 1834] [Records] [Bibliography] [Links]

Up to 1834

Radford had a parish workhouse at 18 St Peter's Street, Radford. Later known as Peveril House, it survived until around 1970.

After 1834

The Radford Poor Law Union formally came into existence on 4th July 1836. Its operation was overseen by an elected Board of Guardians, 19 in number, representing its 4 constituent parishes as listed below (figures in brackets indicate numbers of Guardians if more than one):

County of Nottingham: Liberty of Brewhouse Yard, Lenton (5), Radford (8), Snenton (5).

The population falling within the Union at the 1831 census had been 22,307 — with parishes ranging in size from from Brewhouse Yard (population 80) to Radford itself (12,000). The average annual poor-rate expenditure for the period 1833-35 had been £2,613 or 2s.4d. per head.

A new Radford Union workhouse for 200 inmates was erected in 1837-38 at the south side of Outgang Lane (now Hartley Road) in Nottingham. It cost about £2,600 to build and could accommodate 200 inmates. The building's design appears to have been based on the cruciform layout that was popular at this period. The site location and layout are shown on the 1913 map below.

Radford workhouse site, 1913.

The workhouse was clearly not a popular place with the children who ended up there as demonstrated by this item from the Derby Mercury in 1877.

Derby Mercury, 1877.

In 1880, the Radford Union was dissolved and its member parishes absorbed by the adjacent Nottingham Union. The former Radford workhouse building was later used as a school for workhouse children. The building was demolished in 1961.

Records

Note: many repositories impose a closure period of up to 100 years for records identifying individuals.

Bibliography

  • In the Shadow of the Workhouse by Maurice Caplan (1984)

Links

  • None.

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